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Women's Health Nursing Programs
(found programs from 72 schools)


With women comprising more than 50 percent of the U.S. population, learning more about the specific healthcare needs of this group is essential and can significantly further your nursing career.

If you are interested in learning more about how you can practice as a nursing professional within the specialty area of Women’s Health, you have come to the right place. At BestNursingDegree.com, we aim to provide you with accurate and up to date information about all the different nursing degrees in the U.S., including those that focus on Women’s Health.

To find the specific degree program you are interested in, simply scroll down to our school listings. There you will find links to submit a request for information to each school that you want to learn more about. Once you receive program materials, you can review them to decide which school can best meet your needs.

Whether you are looking for a Midwifery school or a nursing program to become a Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner you can find it here. There are several programs, mostly at the Master’s degree level, that offer a focus on the health of women. The curriculum of these programs is heavily comprised of obstetrical and gynecological training, along with that of pre and post natal care, as well as antepartum and newborn care. In this field, you will provide well woman services, such as routine exams and testing, as well as care for women as they transition through pregnancy, childbirth and post-partum periods.

If you are dedicated to improving the health of women, this could be a very rewarding field of nursing for you. According to the American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM), the is a high degree of communication, collaboration and cooperation across disciplines required to achieve high quality, equitable and patient centered perinatal care. As a nurse who enters Women’s Health, you already possess a great deal of knowledge of how to work with a multidisciplinary approach to achieve patient centered care. This allows you to bring essential services to women in a holistic and high quality way. You can find more information about what Women’s Health Nursing is like in the interview below.

Women seek routine medical care for a variety of reasons, from birth control and PAP smears, to childbirth and delivery services, representing a significant portion of the healthcare system’s overall patient population. If you would like to work as a Women’s Health NP or as a Certified Nurse Midwife, you can likely find a variety of positions in different settings. Hospitals, clinics and birthing centers utilize nurses with advanced education in women’s health, as do non-profits and government agencies.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics report s on a variety of occupations annually, and notes that in 2013 Nurse Midwives made an annual mean salary of $92,230. Nurse Practitioners earned a mean salary of $95,070 annually, according to 2013 data. If you would like to position yourself within this income bracket, while being integral to the provision of high level healthcare services to women, you may have found your niche in nursing.

Listed on this page are all of the schools in the US offering accredited Women's Health Nursing programs. Request information from all of those you are interested in to begin.



Interview with a Women's Health NP - Sue Woodson

Below, BestNursingDegree.com interviews certified nurse midwife and nurse practitioner, Sue Woodson, CNM, MSN. Sue works with Charlottesville Gynecology Specialists. In 2006, she completed specialized training to become a certified colposcopist. Her areas of expertise include women’s, adolescent and reproductive health, among others.

Below she talks about her experiences in women’s health nursing.


Expert Advice: Transcript of Sue Woodson Interview

Q: What is your current position?

I’m actually a nurse midwife. I do comprehensive gynecology, and I also do antepartum care. I don’t do births at the hospital, but I do postpartum care and lactation support. I have additional training for colposcopy, which is evaluation of women that have abnormal Pap smears. I actually also work as a part-time consultant for Planned Parenthood. I do all their colposcopies. I do a lot of IUD insertions and Implanon insertions.

Q: What is women’s health nursing?

It’s the care of women over their lifespan in any specialty, really. Obviously, there’s the women’s health nurse, the educator and the specialties that focus on childbearing. There are [other] specialties that focus on adolescence, menopause or geriatric care. A lot of the time, women have very specific risk factors in each stage of their life.

Q: How did you get started in this field, and what kind of preparation does someone pursuing this career need?

When I went into nursing many years ago, I thought I wanted to work in the emergency room, and I never have. I’ve worked in pediatrics, neurosurgery, outpatient surgery, ICU, and CCU. And then, by chance, when I was in Sumter, South Carolina, the only job opening they had was for a labor delivery nurse.

At that time, I only had a year of nursing experience, and I was put into the night shift position in a community hospital that was very busy to be the charge nurse. The only way I survived was that they had two nursing aides who knew a whole lot more about childbirth than I did. And, they kept me out of trouble, thank goodness. At night when the unit was slow, I stayed awake by reading Williams Obstetrics, and I basically learned OB by default. But, I think because of the tutelage I had, and the mentoring I had, I became very good at it. And so it became my career path.

Q: What career options are available in women’s health?

Quite honestly, when I started out, before I decided to go to nursing school, I thought I wanted to be a physical therapist. I guess the biggest message is, when you decide to go into a four-year program, keep your options open. Even though you may be interested in women’s health care - or you may want to do exercise physiology, nutrition, or [something else] - keep your options open because when you go to school, you’re going to be introduced to so many opportunities that you may not have been aware of. You can focus your career path or change your career path basically anytime.

Q: What is an average day like for a women’s health nurse?

Basically, the day starts out with a report. It’s a way to figure out who’s in labor, who’s not, who’s coming in, and what you’re expecting for the day. You can have women who are coming in to be induced or have scheduled C-sections. And then you have the unknown, those who are going to show up in labor. You can have women who are term, who you’re trying to encourage to go into labor; you can have women who are preterm who you’re trying to stop from going into labor. You can have women in labor and delivery who have delivered but are so medically unstable that you have to keep them in the unit so that they can have the nursing one-on-one care.

As an individual nurse, you can expect to take care of anywhere from one to several laboring patients. The rewards are immense. Even if the pregnancy outcome is not what was hoped for, the feeling of having successfully brought another human being into the world never loses its appeal. It’s always fun. It’s always rewarding, even on the worst day.

Q: In general, are there any specific traits that work well in this career?

That’s what keeps it very exciting. You’re always learning, always changing. That’s true in any health care field. When I finished nursing school back in 1981 with my baccalaureate, I swore that I would never go back to school. I’d had it. And, I’ve been back to school three times. It’s because the more you know, the more you want to know. I’m never bored. Every day I get to see 20 women who I consider my friends, and it’s a privilege. I get to visit with them and get a peek into their lives and hopefully have a positive impact for them. And it’s something you just don’t grow tired of, if you like it.

Q: What are some of the challenges in the field?

It’s very frustrating, as a provider, to try to help patients figure out what their coverage is, and what it is not. I teach a lot of young women, just because I see them for contraceptive needs or pregnancy, to try to negotiate the health care maze. Your particular policy can [almost] vary night and day. It can vary year to year. It can vary or change every time you change your job. People don’t know their insurance benefits, and it makes it very tricky for me, as a provider and a consumer, to figure out how to manage costs.

Q: What kind of changes have there been in women’s health in the last few years?

I’ve been in nursing almost 35 years, and that predates the discovery of HIV. That was probably the biggest change in health care during my career. But the second biggest one, I’d say, is going to be HPV. I remember learning about the role that HPV plays in cervical cancer, and I was dumbfounded that a virus could cause a cancer. And now we take that knowledge for granted, and we have the opportunities to vaccinate, and help protect future generations. Now, I don’t have patients coming in every three to six months for repeat Pap smears because we can test for the HPV and target their care more specifically and more cost-effectively. There are also the changes in contraceptives that have become available, Plan B, for example. To have a contraceptive option after the fact was unheard of 30 years ago.

Q: What do you see for the future of women’s health?

Surveillance for breast health, for example. Now digital mammography is the standard of care. In the past, when it was first introduced, you had to specifically say, "digital mammography." It gives the opportunity for the films to be stored on computers, and the images can be lightened or darkened or rotated, decreasing multiple mammogram exposures on many occasions. Now we’re also able to target recommendations that even include MRI in screening of high-risk populations. With genetic testing, there’s lots of focus now on prevention and screening. If a family member is diagnosed with, for example, breast, colon or ovarian cancer, we can start to do more genetic testing, and get a better handle on risk for other family members.

Q: Any other recommendations for aspiring women’s health professionals?

I think the challenge that I heard from many of the high school students who I taught was that they were intimidated by the cost of education. If cost is a factor for you, start out small. For example, start out at a community college, decide if that’s the career path you want to take, and then you can go to a four-year college by transferring. Or if college is out of the picture for you, try to become a CNA. Then once you get a job, many employers will pay for you to finish school, or go to school. Don’t be intimidated by the cost.

Expert Advice: Women's Health Nursing with Jennifer Fink, RN, BSN

Jennifer L.W. Fink, RN, BSN is a professional freelance writer with almost a decade of experience as a Registered Nurse. She’s worked in both hospitals and nursing homes as a med-surg, geriatric and transplant nurse. Her national publication credits include Parents, RN, Ladies’ Home Journal, Nursing Spectrum, Pregnancy and Journal of Christian Nursing.

Women’s health nursing revolves around the reproductive and gynecologic health needs of women. Even so, most women’s health nurses take a much broader view, recognizing the fact that health cannot be distilled down to a single body system. Women’s health nurses consider their patients in context and examine their patient’s physical, emotional, and spiritual health as well as their living arrangements.

Women’s health nurses are found throughout the healthcare system. Some practice in the offices of OB/GYNs. Others work at community health clinics or for home care agencies. Some women’s health nurses specialize in the care of pregnant women, while others focus on labor, delivery and post-partum care. Some pursue certification as lactation consultants, while others return to school to become nurse practitioners (NPs) in women&rsquos health or certified nurse midwives (CNMs).

Nurses who work primarily with pregnant women in physicians’ offices assess patients’ vital signs, monitor patient weights and perform routine urine tests. They also discuss patient concerns and may provide anticipatory guidance and emotional support. Other women’s health nurses, particularly those in the community, may be actively engaged in education and advocacy. Some nurses work within the community to decrease teen pregnancy rates or to encourage healthy behavior during pregnancy. Others run sex education classes that teach safe sex and STD prevention, encouraging and empowering women to take charge of their own sexual health.

Labor and delivery nurses care for women during childbirth. They monitor the vital signs of mother and baby, to ensure the safety of both. They also monitor the strength and frequency of contractions and vaginal dilation and report their finding to the physician. Most importantly, they provide comfort to the laboring mom, often suggesting alternative positions and non-pharmacological methods of pain control. Labor and delivery nurses also administer pain medications as ordered.

After birth, women’s health nurses monitor mothers for possible infection or hemorrhage. They teach self-care to the moms, and the basics of baby care to the parents. They also help new moms learn to breastfeed. Some women’s health nurses provide baby care as well.

Women’s health nurses are extremely attuned to the unique health concerns of women. They understand the intersection between a woman’s health and her ability to fulfill her roles as a daughter, wife, mother, employee and friend. They watch for signs of possible family violence as well; women are far more likely to be emotionally and physically abused than men. If a women’s health nurse suspects any kind of abuse, she reports it to the local authorities and gives the woman information about how to remain safe.

Because women set the tone for family health, women’s health nurses strive to establish good working relationships with their patients. They know that women who are pleased with their healthcare are women who bring their families in for checkups.


Useful Resources


Show me all the Women's Health Nursing programs in:


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Alabama

The University of Alabama at Birmingham (Birmingham, AL)
Program Name: Nurse Practitioner - Adult/Women’s Health Primary Care
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
University of South Alabama (Mobile, AL)
Program Name: Women’s Health NP (online)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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Arizona

Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ)
Program Name: Womens Health NP
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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Arkansas

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (Little Rock, AR)
Program Name: Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner (online)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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California

California State University-Fullerton (Fullerton, CA)
Program Name: Women’s Health Care - Nurse Midwifery, Women’s Health Care - Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
California State University-Long Beach (Long Beach, CA)
Program Name: Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
San Diego State University (San Diego, CA)
Program Name: Community Health Nursing (Nurse Midwifery), Community Health Nursing (Women’s Health Care NP)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
University of California San Francisco (San Francisco, CA)
Program Name: Midwifery/Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
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Colorado

University of Colorado-Denver (Denver, CO)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery, Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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Connecticut

Yale University (New Haven, CT)
Program Name: Nurse-Midwifery, Women’s Health Primary Care NP
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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District Of Columbia

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Florida

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (Tallahassee, FL)
Program Name: Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: ACEN accredited
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Georgia

Emory University (Atlanta, GA)
Program Name: Family Nurse-Midwife, Women’s Health / Adult Health Nurse Practitioner, Women’s Health Care, Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
Georgia Southern University (Statesboro, GA)
Program Name: Nurse Practitioner (online)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
Georgia State University (Atlanta, GA)
Program Name: Perinatal CNS/Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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Illinois

DePaul University (Chicago, IL)
Program Name: Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
University of Illinois at Chicago (Chicago, IL)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery, Women’s Health NP
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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Indiana

University of Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN)
Program Name: Nurse-Midwife
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
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Kansas

University of Kansas Medical Center (Kansas City, KS)
Program Name: Nurse Midwife
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
Wichita State University (Wichita, KS)
Program Name: Nurse-Midwifery
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
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Kentucky

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Louisiana

Northwestern State University of Louisiana (Shreveport, LA)
Program Name: Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner (WHNP)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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Maryland

Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD)
Program Name: Women’s Health CNS/Nurse Midwifery Track (Midwifery is in partnership with Shenandoah University)
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
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Massachusetts

Boston College (Chestnut Hill, MA)
Program Name: Women's Health NP/CNS
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
MGH Institute of Health Professions (Boston, MA)
Program Name: Adult-Women’s Health NP, NP, Women’s Health CNS, Women’s Health NP
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
Regis College (Weston, MA)
Program Name: Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: ACEN accredited
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Michigan

Grand Valley State University (Grand Rapids, MI)
Program Name: Women’s Health APN (NP/CNS)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI)
Program Name: Certified Nurse-Midwife Program, Midwifery Program, Women’s Health
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
Wayne State University (Detroit, MI)
Program Name: Nurse-Midwife (CNM), Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner (WHNP)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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Minnesota

Metropolitan State University (Saint Paul, MN)
Program Name: Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner (online)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN)
Program Name: Adult Health/Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Midwifery
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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Missouri

University of Missouri-Kansas City (Kansas City, MO)
Program Name: Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
University of Missouri-St. Louis (St. Louis, MO)
Program Name: Women’s Health NP
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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Nebraska

University of Nebraska Medical Center (Omaha, NE)
Program Name: Women’s and Children’s Health Nursing (NP) (online)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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New Jersey

Rutgers The State University of New Jersey-Newark (Newark, NJ)
Program Name: Advanced Practice in Women’s Health (NP) (online)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey (Newark, NJ)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery, Women’s Health NP/Nurse Midwifery, Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner, Women’s Health/Adult NP, Women’s Health/Gerontological NP
Accreditation: ACEN accredited, ACNM accredited
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New Mexico

University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM)
Program Name: Nurse-Midwifery
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
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New York

Columbia University (New York, NY)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery, Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner, Women’s Health with Adult Primary Care Oncology or Nurse Midwifery
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
New York University (New York, NY)
Program Name: MSN/MPH - Nurse-Midwifery
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
State University of New York Downstate Medical Center (Brooklyn, NY)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
Stony Brook University (Stony Brook, NY)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery (online), Perinatal/Women's Health NP/CNS (online)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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North Carolina

East Carolina University (Greenville, NC)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
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Ohio

Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery, Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner (WHNP)
Accreditation: ACEN accredited, ACNM accredited
Kent State University (Kent, OH)
Program Name: Women’s Health NP
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
Ohio State University (Columbus, OH)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery, Women’s Health (NP or CNS)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, OH)
Program Name: Master of Science in Nursing - Nurse-Midwifery (online), Master of Science in Nursing - Womens Health Nurse Practitioner (online)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
University of Cincinnati - Online (Cincinnati, OH)
Program Name: MSN - Nurse Midwifery (online), MSN - Womens Health Nurse Practitioner (online)
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Oregon

Oregon Health & Science University (Portland, OR)
Program Name: Certified Nurse Midwifery
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
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Pennsylvania

Drexel University (Philadelphia, PA)
Program Name: Women’s Health NP (online)
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
Philadelphia University (Philadelphia, PA)
Program Name: MS - Midwifery (online)
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
Thomas Jefferson University (Danville, PA / Philadelphia, PA)
Program Name: Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA)
Program Name: Nurse-Midwifery, Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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South Carolina

University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC)
Program Name: Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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Tennessee

The University of Tennessee-Knoxville (Knoxville, TN)
Program Name: Women’s Health Clinical Specialist, Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN)
Program Name: Nurse-Midwifery, Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner - WHNP, Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner/ Adult Nurse Practitioner - WHNP/ANP Dual Focus
Accreditation: ACEN accredited, ACNM accredited
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Texas

Baylor University (Dallas, TX)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery (CNM)
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
The University of Texas at El Paso (El Paso, TX)
Program Name: Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
The University of Texas at Tyler (Tyler, TX)
Program Name: Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (Houston, TX)
Program Name: Women’s Health
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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Utah

University of Utah (Salt Lake City, UT)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery and Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: ACNM accredited
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Virginia

Hampton University (Hampton, VA)
Program Name: Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
James Madison University (Harrisonburg, VA)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
Old Dominion University (Norfolk, VA)
Program Name: Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
Virginia Commonwealth University (Richmond, VA)
Program Name: Women's Health
Accreditation: ACEN accredited
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Washington

Seattle University (Seattle, WA)
Program Name: Nurse-Midwifery
University of Washington (Seattle, WA)
Program Name: Women’s Health NP
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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West Virginia

Marshall University (Huntington, WV)
Program Name: MSN - Nurse Midwifery
Accreditation: ACEN accredited
West Virginia University (Morgantown, WV / Parkersburg, WV)
Program Name: Women’s Health NP
Accreditation: CCNE accredited
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Wisconsin

Marquette University (Milwaukee, WI)
Program Name: Nurse Midwifery
Accreditation: CCNE accredited